Scafell Pike - Route One



 
 
Start - Wasdale Head NY 182 074 Distance - 2.4 miles Ascent - 2,993 feet Time - 2 hours : 30 minutes
 

 

 

The National Trust car park which is adjacent to the campsite is the starting point for this walk
Lingmell, Scafell pike and Scafell from the car park
Great Gable and Lingmell from the Mountain Rescue vehicles' parking area
After crossing the wide bridge spanning Lingmell Gill follow the old Corpse Road Road track which is signed for Eskdale and Miterdale.  The track soon splits - keep left at the fork and follow a permissive path which avoids Brackenclose, the Fell and Rock Climbing Club hut, set in its wooded enclosure
Brackenclose from the permissive path
The pemissive path runs alongside Lingmell Gill towards a footbridge where it joins a Right of Way path
Lingmell and Scafell Pike across Lingmell Gill
The footbridge over Lingmell Gill
Looking back from the footbridge over Lingmell Gill
Over the footbridge the path rises to a handgate where it is joined by a permissive path which comes up directly from the campsite 
Looking over towards Pillar and Kirk Fell
Scafell Pike and Scafell from the handgate
Looking back to Wast Water from the handgate
The path continues alongside the tree shrouded Lingmell Gill towards a handgate in the intake wall
Looking back from the path alongside the Lingmell Gill ravine
Scafell Pike from Lingmell Gill
Shortly before reaching the gate another path joins from the left this one comes up from the large parking area on Wasdale Head Green
The gate in the intake wall which gives access to the open fellsides
The path continues to climb steadily towards Brown Tongue
Looking back to Wast Water flanked by Illgill Head on the left with Buckbarrow and Middle Fell on the right
Pikes Crag, Pulpit Rock and Mickledore Buttress over Brown Tongue
Lingmell Gill is crossed just beyond its confluence with an unamed stream
The crossing point over Lingmell Gill
Looking back from the crossing point over Lingmell Gill
The path alongside the unamed stream has been extensively stone-pitched to reduce erosion
Looking back to the crossing point over Lingmell Gill
Scafell Crag and Black Crag from the Brown Tongue path
Looking back across the slopes of Lingmell to Yewbarrow and Red Pike
Higher on the Brown Tongue path
Looking  back from the Brown Tongue path
Approaching the top of Brown Tongue
Looking back to Yewbarrow, Haycock, Red Pike and Scoat Fell from near the top of Brown Tongue
Wast Water from near the top of Brown Tongue
At the top of Brown Tongue the path divides, bear right for Mickledore.  The left branch continues via Hollow Stones to ascend Scafell Pike via the north-west ridge, commonly known as the 'tourist path', it's slightly longer but easier than the Mickledore path
On the Mickledore path
Looking over Hollow Stones to the 'tourist path' which can be seen zig-zagging towards Lingmell Col and the north-west ridge
Looking back to Yewbarrow, Haycock, Red Pike, Scoat Fell, Black Crag and Pillar from the Mickledore path
Pikes Crag, Pulpit Rock and Mickledore Buttress ahead
Looking over to Scafell Crag from the path to Mickledore
Looking back to Rakehead Crag from the Mickledore path
The stone-pitching resumes as the path climbs more steeply towards an area of boulders
Pulpit Rock and Mickledore Buttress from the 'big boulder; which AW noted in his diagram of this ascent
Approaching the scree slope below Mickledore with the Central Buttess of Scafell Crag on the right
Looking over to Pulpit Rock and Mickledore Buttress
Looking back from the scree slope
The usual way to gain the Mickledore ridge is by a steep gully which cuts through the broken crags.  The gully is very eroded and unpleasant, it's much better to traverse left from the top of the scree and ascend a path which runs below the end of Mickledore Buttress
Initially the path runs alongside the side of rock slabs
Looking over to Lord's Rake on Scafell Crag
Yewbarrow, Caw Fell, Haycock, Red Pike, Scoat Fell, Black Crag and Pillar across Mickledore Buttress 
The upper part of the path leading to Mickledore
Looking back on the path which runs below Mickledore Buttress
Bowfell and Crinkle Crags from Mickledore
The Coniston Fells from Mickledore
The East Buttess of Scafell Crag from Mickledore
Scafell Crag from Mickledore
Lord's Rake from Mickledore, the walker standing on the first col helps add a sense of scale
Looking north-west from Mickledore to the Mosedale Horseshoe
Pulpit Rock across Mickledore Buttress
The path from Mickledore leading up to the summit of Scafell Pike
Looking over to Scafell Pike's south peak which provides a wonderful view of Eskdale 
Looking back to Scafell Crag above Mickledore
Broadcrag Tarn, the highest tarn in the Lake District, comes into view
Harter Fell and the Duddon Estuary across Scafell's Camcrag ridge
Crinkle Crags across the slopes of the south peak
Looking down on Nether Wasdale
Looking back to Mickledore and Scafell Crag
The summit of Scafell Pike comes into view
The summit of Scafell now in view
The Mickledore path re-unites with the 'tourist path' at a marker cairn 
Looking over to Skiddaw from the 'tourist path'
The final slope leading up to the summit
Looking over to the fells encircling Mosedale
Walkers ascending the path from Miickledore and about to join the 'tourist path'
Approaching the summit of Scafell Pike
The summit cairn on Scafell Pike
Looking north-east over the summits of Broad Crag, Ill Crag and Great End to the Helvellyn range
Bowfell from the summit of Scafell Pike
Crinkle Crags and the Coniston Fells from the summit of Scafell Pike
Black Combe over Camcrag Ridge with Harter Fell on the left
Scafell from the summit of Scafell Pike
Wast Water from the summit of Scafell Pike
 Caw Fell, Haycock, Red Pike, Scoat Fell, Black Crag and Pillar from the summit of Scafell Pike
Great Gable backed by the Northwestern Fells from the summit of Scafell Pike
Looking north to Skiddaw and Blencathra from the summit of Scafell Pike

 

 

 

 

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